All Eyes On Africa: Ethiopia’s Tigray Conflict

Located at the Horn of Africa, where the heat mixes with the humidity to create the climate that favors the eruption of clashes, Ethiopia stands proud, carrying centuries of history and culture on its back. Landlocked and separated from the rest of the Muslim-dominated African countries, it now finds itself battling internal demons apart from external foes. What started as a border skirmish between Ethiopia and Eritrea in 1998 has now escalated into a fully developed civil war that threatens the status quo. But who is Abiy Ahmed and who are Tigray’s so-called liberation fighters?

The Abraham Accords: a new page for the Middle East?

The current Israeli-Palestinian conflict dates back to 1947. In 1947, the United Nations adopted Resolution 181, which sought to divide the British Mandate of Palestine into Arab and Jewish states. On May 14, 1948, the State of Israel was created, sparking the first Arab-Israeli War. The war ended in 1949 with Israel’s victory.

Revisionist Territorialism: Turkish Foreign Policy Unravelled

In the past few months, Erdogan’s boisterous efforts to revivify the glory of the Ottoman Empire have dominated national and international headlines. The combination between the desire to form a strengthened and more assertive Turkey bearing the glory of its empire years has been termed “neo-Ottomanism”. Once one of the strongest and heavily multi-ethnic empires, stretching from the eastern Mediterranean to the heart of the Middle East, Turkey has recently commemorated a new turn in its foreign policy, one seeking the glory and security of the past.

Overview of the Nagorno Karabakh War

In the recent weeks we have been flooded with information regarding the recently reignited conflict. However, this war isn’t of recent development, the area has known tensions since decades. The historic tension is generated by a discrepancy between who is de facto in control over the region, Armenia and who is de jure recognized as the Sovereign of the land, Azerbaijan. Nagorno Karabakh is an 11,458 square kilometers area with an estimated population of 143,000, the majority of which is ethnically Armenian, around 95%.

Protests In Belarus: The End of Europe’s Last Dictator?

In these weeks, Belarus is facing the most important and persistent demonstrations since its independence from the USSR in 1991. For months, a sense of general disapproval about President Alexander Lukashenko’s government had been growing because of the inadequate way he had dealt with numerous situations, including the Coronavirus pandemic. Since the beginning of August, the country has been going through several violent protests between police and demonstrators, where frequent violations of human rights and the arrest of thousands of protesters were reported.

From Strategic Depth to Blue Homeland, understanding Turkey’s strategic positioning

During the last few months the Eastern Mediterranean Sea became a particularly troubled hot spot with Turkey, Greece, and France being the main conflicting players. On one side we see Turkey, trying to assert its interests as well as those of Turkish-Cypriots. On the other, Greece, together with the strong support of France and of the Republic of Cyprus.

Implications of the Japan–Korea Trade Dispute

Japan and South Korea are among the largest economies in Asia. Post World War II, both economies grew at rapid pace, becoming the economic powerhouses we know today. Unfortunately, things are not as rosy as they seem; both countries are undergoing a trade dispute on top of rising military and geopolitical tensions.

Turkish Incursion in Cypriot Gas Fields: Provocation or Strategy?

In 2019 and in the first half of 2020, Turkey has sent some drillships in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea, in particular in the south of Cyprus, in order to look for new gas and oil fields without asking permission from Cyprus and the EU. The problem is that the area where Turkey has sent its drillships is an Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) of Cyprus, an area which cannot be violated by another country and whose resources can be only exploited by the country to which it belongs. It is for this reason that the EU, especially Cyprus and Greece, has strongly condemned Ankara’s incursion. The situation is very complicated and, as well as the never-ending fight for energy resources and the different aims of involved countries, the decennial problem between Cyprus and Turkey has been brought back into the spotlight.

Al-Sisi’s rise to power and the next geopolitical issues for Egypt

On July 3, 2013, the path to become the new Pharaoh of Egypt begun for Abdel Fattah al-Sisi. With a coupe d’état, Mayor General al-Sisi toppled with the support of the Egyptian Army President Morsi, elected around one year before during the first democratic election after decades of dominance by the former “Pharaoh”, Hosni Mubarak.