The East-Med Pipeline: a new regional energy shift or not?

Since its inception, Israel was an energy-starved country surrounded by hostile, oil-rich neighbours. This perception changed in 1999 with the discovery of the Noa gas field off the shores of Ashkelon. However, the discovery of more major natural gas fields in Israel since 2009, including Tamar and Leviathan, has transformed Israel from an energy-dependent country into an energy supplier, both domestically and abroad.

Tension over the Nile: an Ethiopian perspective

It would not be inaccurate to say that the Nile river, the longest in all of Eurasia, has played a foundational role in human history. After all, it has given rise to one of the first recorded civilizations thanks to its abundance of fresh water. This is no less true today, where it keeps shaping African geopolitics thanks to the vast resources it offers the nations it traverses: fish in abundance, an easy medium for transport, the possibility for hydroelectric power generation, and most importantly, fresh water.

The Abraham Accords: a new page for the Middle East?

The current Israeli-Palestinian conflict dates back to 1947. In 1947, the United Nations adopted Resolution 181, which sought to divide the British Mandate of Palestine into Arab and Jewish states. On May 14, 1948, the State of Israel was created, sparking the first Arab-Israeli War. The war ended in 1949 with Israel’s victory.

Al-Sisi’s rise to power and the next geopolitical issues for Egypt

On July 3, 2013, the path to become the new Pharaoh of Egypt begun for Abdel Fattah al-Sisi. With a coupe d’état, Mayor General al-Sisi toppled with the support of the Egyptian Army President Morsi, elected around one year before during the first democratic election after decades of dominance by the former “Pharaoh”, Hosni Mubarak.